Can you fish for walleye at night?

Can you fish for walleye at night?

One of the advantages of night fishing for walleye is that they often move up into the shallows during the evening hours. This means that you can fish for walleye from the shoreline, from a fishing pier, or from your boat.

Are walleye attracted to light at night?

A few more night fishing tips to keep in mind: At night, walleye are attracted to light, so use lighted or glow-in-the-dark jug heads. Be sure to match your lure size with the bait size. Always use a slip bobber, and be sure to reel in the slack before you set the hook.

How do you fish for walleye on shore?

Rig swimbaits on a 1/2- to 1-ounce Owner Bullet Head Jig or Kalin’s Ultimate Saltwater Bullet Jig tied to 15- to 30-pound-test braided mainline. These tactics work equally well in tailraces where smaller jigs go unnoticed by big walleyes and crankbaits get blown out by current.

Do walleye like fast moving water?

When the water is clear, walleyes will be in the deeper water, but close to shallow water. They will also prefer areas that have slack water. They typically don’t want to be fighting fast moving water. You can cast this bait downstream and work it back upstream, but work it slowly, especially if the water is stained.

What is the best way to catch walleye?

There is no one way to catch walleye. In fact, there are many different ways. Popular techniques include casting a jig-and-minnow, trolling live bait, casting or trolling hard plastic lures and even fishing with a bobber. All work.

How do you catch a walleye that won’t bite?

Slow, methodical lifts of a bucktail or twistertail will do the trick, and the addition of a minnow or worm may coax the inactive walleye to become more co-operative. If you are fishing a deep northern shield lake, then your best bet is to fish deeper, while keying in on productive structure areas.

How do you properly use a jig?

How to Jig in Simple Steps

  1. Cast out and let your jig hook sink to the bottom and count a few seconds or wait until you feel the spoon hit the bottom.
  2. Snap or pop your wrist and rod tip up quickly a short distance and let the lure drop back to the bottom.
  3. You can jig up and down, side to side or up and down and sideways.

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