Is it okay to paraphrase?

Is it okay to paraphrase?

As mentioned in our previous article on plagiarism, “simply taking another writer’s ideas and rephrasing them as one’s own can be considered plagiarism as well.” Paraphrasing is acceptable if you interpret and synthesize the information from your sources, rephrasing the ideas in your own words and adding citations at …

How do you not paraphrase?

Ineffective Paraphrasing StrategiesAvoid switching out or changing around of a few words in an author’s sentence(s) for use in your paper.Avoid failing to acknowledge (through an in-text citation or direct quotes) the outside source from which you obtained your information or ideas.

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What is an acceptable paraphrase?

Compare paraphrase 1 and 2 to the original text. For a paraphrase to be acceptable, you need to be able to answer yes to the following: The meaning is the same. Most of the words have been changed. The sentences have been significantly restructured.

Do you need to cite when paraphrasing?

When you paraphrase, you use your own words. When paraphrasing, you must still acknowledge where you got the idea from by including a parenthetical citation. When citing paraphrased information, APA requires you to include the author and date. It is also recommended (but not required) that you include the page number.

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How do you cite a paraphrase in text?

When you write information or ideas from a source in your own words, cite the source by adding an in-text citation at the end of the paraphrased portion, like this: ​This is a paraphrase (Smith 8). This is a paraphrase (“Trouble” 22). Note: The period goes outside the brackets, at the end of your in-text citation.

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