What do you do when someone is having a diabetic seizure?

What do you do when someone is having a diabetic seizure?

Learn first aid for someone who is having a diabetic emergency

  1. Give them something sweet to eat or a non-diet drink. If someone has a diabetic emergency, their blood sugar levels can become too low. This can make them collapse.
  2. Reassure the person. Most people will gradually improve, but if in doubt, call 999.

When should a diabetic call an ambulance?

An ambulance will be needed if someone has either very high or very low blood sugar levels that presents an immediate danger and neither they nor anyone around is confidently able to treat them. Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome are both life threatening conditions.

What is considered a diabetic emergency?

Sometimes those who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar level becomes too high or too low. Both conditions could be serious and may need treatment in hospital. Insulin is a chemical produced by the pancreas (that lies behind the stomach).

What is the most common diabetic emergency?

The most common DKA trigger is being sick or having an infection. Some medicines or a big stress, like having a heart attack, can cause it, too. DKA can happen fast, usually in less than 24 hours.

When should I go to ER for blood sugar?

According to the University of Michigan, blood sugar levels of 300 mg/dL or more can be dangerous. They recommend calling a doctor if you have two readings in a row of 300 or more. Call your doctor if you’re worried about any symptoms of high blood sugar. They can offer advice and reassurance.

What are the two diabetic emergencies?

There are two types of hyperglycemic emergencies: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). These situations require emergency medical intervention, since they can lead to serious conditions such as coma, even death, if left untreated.

What is a safe blood sugar level for type 2 diabetes?

Less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is normal. 140 to 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L and 11.0 mmol/L) is diagnosed as prediabetes. 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher after two hours suggests diabetes.

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