What does Hamlet mean when he says O what a rogue and peasant slave am I?

What does Hamlet mean when he says O what a rogue and peasant slave am I?

O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I! ‘: Hamlet considers himself a ‘rogue’ (i.e. a cheat) and a ‘peasant slave’ (i.e. a base or low coward) for failing to do the brave and honourable thing and exact revenge on Claudius for his father.

Who says Oh what a rogue and peasant slave am I?

Hamlet

What does Hamlet mean when he says now I am alone?

27 answers. | Certified Educator. This is the opening to Hamlet’s soliloquy in which he shows some insight into his own character. He knows he is a procrastinator, yet cannot bring himself to do what needs to be done.

How does Hamlet feel about himself Act 2 Scene 2?

He resents himself for being unable to stir up the anger and vengefulness he would need to man up and murder Claudius. Hamlet knows that he’s stalling, and hates himself for it.

Who does Hamlet compare himself to Act 2 Scene 2?

Hamlet compares himself to the Player: while the Player weeps for a person he never knew, Hamlet has so far done nothing to avenge his own murdered father. This contrast creates a whole new layer of doubt for Hamlet.

Why is Hamlet upset with himself Act 2 Scene 2?

In his third soliloquy (act 2, scene 2), Hamlet recriminates himself for his lack of courage, which prevents him from avenging his father’s murder. 540-541) Hamlet concludes that he must be cowardly; otherwise, he would have slain Claudius, the “bloody, bawdy, villain” (2.2.

Why is Hamlet upset with himself Act 2?

Why is Hamlet upset with himself after hearing the player’s dramatic speech? Hamlet is upset that the player can make himself so passionate about a mere fictional story, while Hamlet seemingly can’t muster the same passion for his real-life revenge.

Is Hamlet really crazy or just pretending?

Despite the evidence that Hamlet actually is mad, we also see substantial evidence that he is just pretending. The most obvious evidence is that Hamlet himself says he is going to pretend to be mad, suggesting he is at least sane enough to be able to tell the difference between disordered and rational behavior.

Did you assay him to any pastime?

QUEEN Did you assay him to any pastime? This night to play before him. To hear him so inclined. And drive his purpose into these delights.

What scene is to be or not to be?

“To be, or not to be” is the opening phrase of a soliloquy given by Prince Hamlet in the so-called “nunnery scene” of William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1. In the speech, Hamlet contemplates death and suicide, bemoaning the pain and unfairness of life but acknowledging that the alternative might be worse.

What is the full line of to be or not to be?

Hamlet, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] Than fly to others that we know not of? With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.

Who killed Ophelia in Hamlet?

Laertes

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