What excerpt from Act Three of Hamlet supports the conclusion that Hamlet is critical of woman?

What excerpt from Act Three of Hamlet supports the conclusion that Hamlet is critical of woman?

Answer: The excerpt from Act III of Hamlet that best portrays the demeaning way in which Hamlet looks at women, comes in scene I, “I have heard of your paintings too, well enough. God has given you one face and you make yourselves another.

What line from Act 3 of Hamlet supports the conclusion that Shakespeare is a critical of actors?

Answer Expert Verified. The correct answer is: “Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters.” Here, Hamlet is offering up a criticism of actors, whom he describes as “robustious” and “periwig-pated,” meaning he feels actors are pompus and wig-wearing.

What line from Act III of Hamlet supports the conclusion?

Act III of Hamlet provides an excerpt that best supports the claim. That is to say, this part: “I have heard of your paintings too, well enough. God has given you one face, and you make yourselves another. You jig and amble, and you lisp, you nickname God’s creatures and make your wantonness your ignorance.”

Which statement best describes why King Claudius is a complex character in Act 3 of Hamlet?

Which statement best describes why King Claudius is a complex character in Act III of Hamlet? He expresses regret for his previous behaviors. He is a human representation of greed.

Which statement best describes why Shakespeare Hamlet is a complex?

Which statement best describes why Shakespeare’s Hamlet is a complex character? His actions and emotions are varied and unpredictable. Read the excerpt from Act III of Hamlet.

Which statement best explains why Shakespeare alludes to Hecuba throughout Act 2 Scene 2 Hamlet?

Which statement best explains why Shakespeare alludes to Hecuba throughout Act II, Scene ii of Hamlet? Like Gertrude, Hecuba has married the brother of her dead husband. Like Gertrude, Hecuba shows little emotion after the death of her husband. In contrast to Gertrude, Hecuba takes revenge on her husband’s killer.

What should audience members ask themselves when they evaluate how an actor?

What should audience members ask themselves when they evaluate how an actor interprets a character? -The character experiences a variety of human emotions. -The character possesses a complex personality. -The character grows or develops over the course of a play.

What is the most accurate evaluation of the thesis?

Which is the most accurate evaluation of the thesis? The thesis is effective because it covers a broad topic while maintaining an objective viewpoint. The thesis is ineffective because it lacks clear transitions between the thoughts of the writer.

Which soliloquy in Hamlet is the most important and why?

Hamlet: ‘To Be Or Not To Be, That Is The Question’ ‘To be or not to be, that is the question’ is the most famous soliloquy in the works of Shakespeare – quite possibly the most famous soliloquy in literature.

What does Hamlet believe about death?

In the beginning of his soliloquy, Hamlet views death as a peaceful liberation from the never-ending agony and constant battery of troubles in life. Through diction, syntax, and figurative language, it is evident that Hamlet’s conception of death as a calm and peaceful slumber makes him prone to suicidal feelings.

Why is Hamlet scared of dying?

Hamlet’s grief and misery is such that he frequently longs for death to end his suffering, but he fears that if he commits suicide, he will be consigned to eternal suffering in hell because of the Christian religion’s prohibition of suicide. In his famous “To be or not to be” soliloquy (III.

Why is Hamlet obsessed with death?

Death permeates “Hamlet” right from the opening scene of the play, where the ghost of Hamlet’s father introduces the idea of death and its consequences. Hamlet is fascinated by death throughout the play. Deeply rooted in his character, this obsession with death is likely a product of his grief.

Who is responsible for Ophelia’s death?

Gertrude

What scene does Ophelia go mad?

As befits a scene full of anger and dark thoughts, Act IV, scene v brings a repetition of the motif of insanity, this time through the character of Ophelia, who has truly been driven mad by the death of her father.

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