What options did Kennedy have during the Cuban missile crisis?

What options did Kennedy have during the Cuban missile crisis?

Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara presents JFK with three options: diplomacy with Cuban leader Fidel Castro and Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev, a naval quarantine of Cuba, and an air attack to destroy the missile sites, which might kill thousands of Soviet personnel and trigger a Soviet counterattack on a target …

How did President Kennedy respond to the information that the Soviet Union was placing nuclear missile?

A naval blockade -is how President Kennedy responded to the information that the Soviet Union was placing nuclear missiles in Cuba. A naval blockade -is how President Kennedy responded to the information that the Soviet Union was placing nuclear missiles in Cuba. This answer has been confirmed as correct and helpful.

What did Kennedy say about the Cuban missile crisis?

These missile sites—under construction but nearing completion—housed medium-range missiles capable of striking a number of major cities in the United States, including Washington, D.C. Kennedy announced that he was ordering a naval “quarantine” of Cuba to prevent Soviet ships from transporting any more offensive …

How did John F Kennedy stop the Cuban missile crisis?

After many long and difficult meetings, Kennedy decided to place a naval blockade, or a ring of ships, around Cuba. The aim of this “quarantine,” as he called it, was to prevent the Soviets from bringing in more military supplies. He demanded the removal of the missiles already there and the destruction of the sites.

What were the two final results of the Cuban missile crisis?

Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev orders withdrawal of missiles from Cuba, ending the Cuban Missile Crisis. Kennedy announced a naval blockade to prevent the arrival of more missiles and demanded that the Soviets dismantle and remove the weapons already in Cuba.

What changes occurred as a result of the Cuban missile crisis?

The result of the Cuban Missile Crisis was an increasing buildup of nuclear weapons that continued until the end of the Cold War. Air Force General Curtis LeMay was less sanguine because the U.S. had already been limiting its above ground tests while the Soviets had been increasing their own.

What was the strategy of mad?

Mutually assured destruction (MAD) is a doctrine of military strategy and national security policy in which a full-scale use of nuclear weapons by two or more opposing sides would cause the complete annihilation of both the attacker and the defender (see pre-emptive nuclear strike and second strike).

Why was the United States deeply invested in this Cold War crisis?

Answer: The United States got involved in the Cold War because it believed that communism was a threat to the stability and freedom of the world. It believed that the Soviet Union would do whatever it could to spread its ideology to as much of the world as was possible.

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